DLL AQI Policy

UpdatedWednesday October 21, 2020 byDLL Registrar.

Davis Little League

Policy on Air Quality

October 2020

 

Purpose: The purpose of this document is to give guidance to managers, coaches, and parents of players regarding air quality and player participation in DLL sanctioned activities.

 

Population: The age of players in DLL range between 4 and 12 years of age. The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Office of Air Quality, has defined children under the age of 18 as a “sensitive group.”

 

The AQI (Air Quality Index) is a measurement that runs from 0 to 500. The higher the AQI value, the greater the level of air pollution and the greater the health concern. For example, an AQI value of 50 or below represents good air quality, while an AQI value over 300 represents hazardous air quality. The AQI is divided into six categories. Each category corresponds to a different level of health concern.

 

DLL recommends managers, coaches, and parents plan their player’s level of activity in DLL sanctioned activities using the EPA’s AQI. DLL recommends checking the most updated AQI levels using the Airnow.gov website or app at a reasonable time before practices and games to plan their level of activity and participation.

 

Using the EPA, Office of Air Quality, Air Quality Guide for Particle Pollution (click attached link), DLL managers will suspend baseball activities when the AQI is above 150 (Unhealthy for Everyone). When the AQI is between 100-149, DLL recommends managers/coaches reduce prolonged or heavy exertion and add rest breaks during the activity.

 

DLL acknowledges that parents, guardians, and players know their individual’s medical conditions the best. Players with asthma or other respiratory/cardiovascular illness should be medically managing their condition. That includes limiting their intensity, increasing rest periods to lower their breathing rates, or not participating when they see fit.

 

Managers/coaches cannot retaliate against a player or their family for managing a medical condition related to air quality. Examples of retaliation may be “benching” a player or limiting their playtime during a game, not giving play/training opportunities at key positions, or simply treating the player differently during normal interactions. DLL expects players, family, and coaching staff to communicate these needs and expectations to each other before the start and during the season of play.